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Doctor Faustus
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Act IV, Scene vi

Enter ROBIN, DICK, the HORSE-COURSER, and a CARTER.
CARTER. Come, my masters, I'll bring you to the best beer in
Europe.—What, ho, hostess! where be these whores?
Enter HOSTESS.:
HOSTESS. How now! what lack you? What, my old guess!<201> welcome.
ROBIN. Sirrah Dick, dost thou<202> know why I stand so mute?
DICK. No, Robin: why is't?
ROBIN. I am eighteen-pence on the score. but say nothing; see
if she have forgotten me.
HOSTESS. Who's this that stands so solemnly by himself? What,
my old guest!
ROBIN. O, hostess, how do you? I hope my score stands still.
HOSTESS. Ay, there's no doubt of that; for methinks you make no
haste to wipe it out.
DICK. Why, hostess, I say, fetch us some beer.
HOSTESS. You shall presently.—Look up into the hall there, ho!
[Exit.—Drink is presently brought in.]
DICK. Come, sirs, what shall we do now<203> till mine hostess comes?
CARTER. Marry, sir,<204> I'll tell you the bravest tale how a
conjurer served me. You know Doctor Faustus?
HORSE-COURSER. Ay, a plague take him! here's some on's have cause
to know him. Did he conjure thee too?
CARTER. I'll tell you how he served me. As I was going to
Wittenberg, t'other day,<205> with a load of hay, he met me, and
asked me what he should give me for as much hay as he could eat.
Now, sir, I thinking that a little would serve his turn, bad him
take as much as he would for three farthings: so he presently
gave me my<206> money and fell to eating; and, as I am a cursen<207>
man, he never left eating till he had eat up all my load of hay.
ALL. O, monstrous! eat a whole load of hay!
ROBIN. Yes, yes, that may be; for I have heard of one that has eat
a load of logs.
HORSE-COURSER. Now, sirs, you shall hear how villanously he
served me. I went to him yesterday to buy a horse of him, and
he would by no means sell him under forty dollars. So, sir,
because I knew him to be such a horse as would run over hedge
and ditch and never tire, I gave him his money. So, when I had
my horse, Doctor Faustus bad me ride him night and day, and spare
him no time; but, quoth he, in any case, ride him not into the
water. Now, sir, I thinking the horse had had some quality<208>
that he would not have me know of, what did I but rid<209> him
into a great river? and when I came just in the midst, my horse
vanished away, and I sate straddling upon a bottle of hay.
ALL. O, brave doctor!
HORSE-COURSER. But you shall hear how bravely I served him for
it. I went me home to his house, and there I found him asleep.
I kept a hallooing and whooping in his ears; but all could not
wake him. I, seeing that, took him by the leg, and never rested
pulling till I had pulled me his leg quite off; and now 'tis at
home in mine hostry.
ROBIN. And has the doctor but one leg, then? that's excellent;
for one of his devils turned me into the likeness of an ape's face.
CARTER. Some more drink, hostess!
ROBIN. Hark you, we'll into another room and drink a while, and
then we'll go seek out the doctor.
[Exeunt.]
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